Patients taking SSRIs twice as likely to have dental implant failure

From McGill News:

Depression drugs linked to failure of dental implants

News

A team from McGill University has discovered that people who take the most common antidepressants (such as Celexa, Paxil, Lexapro, Prozac, and Zoloft, the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors or SSRIs) are twice as likely to have dental implants fail as those who are not taking SSRIs.
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Published: 11 Sep 2014

“Because antidepressants, which are widely used around the world, are reported to increase the risk of bone fracture and reduce bone formation, we were curious to see how they might affect dental implants,” says Prof. Faleh Tamimi, the lead author on the study and a professor in McGill’s School of Dentistry. “Even so, we were surprised to discover that the negative effect of SSRIs on dental implants was so strong, almost equal to that of smoking, a well-established hazard for oral health.”

The researchers reached this conclusion by looking back over the records of dental implants done over a six-year period, between 2007 – 2013, in a clinic in Moncton, New Brunswick. Follow-ups took place with the patients between three and 67 months after the implant was done to see whether it had been successful.

Results of 916 dental implants done on 490 patients

Number of patients Number of implants Successful implants Implant failures Implant failures as a percentage of total number of implants done
Patients not taking SSRIs 439 822 784 38 4.62 %
Patients taking SSRIs 51 94 84 10 10.64%

[…]

To read the full text Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and the Risk of Osseointegrated Implant Failure, A Cohort Study” par X. Wu et al in the Journal of Dental Research

Read more. 

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